Writing Dialogue

Writing Dialogue

Writing Dialogue: I have never attempted to write a play and I would imagine it to be very difficult in conjuring up one that is
completely original.

Writing Dialogue: I have never attempted to write a play and I would imagine it to be very difficult in conjuring up one that is
completely original.  I believe that is why so many of the plays that are written by playwrights are spin-offs
or have similar stories as past successful plays.  A playwright that spoke to me in the chapter, Suzan-Lori
Parksis an excellent example of this.  She took The Scarlett Letter and reworked it into her it into her own
play In the Blood.  She spoke to me because she typically writes plays that displays truths through
abstract ways, which I enjoy.  Since taking old ideas from previous plays is a common theme for many
playwrights I would think writing the dialogue would be the most difficult part.  The verbal communication
is important for the audience to get an understanding of who the characters are but the nonverbal and
stage cues are equally important for the audience to see the true colors of a character.  Dialogue and
character's actions are the most simplest ways to develop a character.  This means it is crucial to have
the dialogue accurately represent the character's traits so the audience is able to easily follow along.  
Reference
Cohen, R. & Sherman, D. (2017). Theatre, Brief, 11th Edition. [Yuzu]. Retrieved
from  https://reader.yuzu.com/#/books/undefined/

When you have a popular character, the audience has already made a connection and it is easier to
engage the audience with a new story. This is reflective in how many spinoffs there are, as you
mentioned. We see it from sequels to movies, movies to television series, or even movies to Broadway
and vice versa. Even when you have the right characters in place, you cannot lose the audience with poor
setup and dialogue. I had an opportunity to director a play and I did not realize how difficult the offstage
cues and lighting is, and how much it contributes to the play. In addition, if the dialogue isn’t there, the
audience will get lost and might even disconnect from the character. Even if they liked the character
previously, a poor dialogue might have the audience disengage. The dialogue provides structure to the
play in the control of the playwright through the action and reaction of the character (Cohen and Sherman
73). The dialogue gives the character life through background and interactions.  
Reference
Cohen, R. & Sherman, D. (2017). Theatre, Brief, (11th ed.). [Yuzu]. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill
Education. Retrieved from  https://reader.yuzu.com/#/books/undefined/
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Answer preview for Writing Dialogue: I have never attempted to write a play and I would imagine it to be very difficult in conjuring up one that is completely original.

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