Video Games Contribute Significantly to Juvenile Delinquency

Video Games Contribute Significantly to Juvenile Delinquency

An “analysis” is, by definition, a “breaking down” of an object of study into its component parts.
This definition is very simple when applied to concrete objects (a school bus, for example, might be examined by the composition of its rubber tires, metal frame, upholstered seats, and electrical wiring), but when applied to more abstract objects, it becomes vague very quickly.
A better way to think of analysis is as an examination of what all of the different elements of an object (or idea) mean: what do they cost? Who do they benefit?  Who might they hurt? Why are they done this way instead of some other way? A school bus can also be analyzed in terms of these more abstract elements: how expensive are its materials?  How safe is it?  How many students can it carry?  Who is it safe for?  What kinds of students do standard school buses not serve?  What other options allow for the transportation of students to school?
An audience analysis should be thought of in terms of this second, more abstract definition rather than the first. Although it’s helpful to have an idea of who the individual people are who make up an audience, it’s not necessary to know them all (each as their own “component part”). Instead, a writer should consider the audience as a group, but should still think about what kinds of people make up this group: what are their interests and priorities? What do they need? What do they fear? What can they afford? What do they have to gain from changes to a particular process or product? What do they have to lose? Are these all the same, or are there different concerns represented?  What are their areas of knowledge/expertise, and what are they likely NOT to know and to need explained to them?
Using the language of and examples in this week’s assigned readings about audience, think about the topic/problem you have chosen for your Problem Analysis and Proposal project.
Who is affected by this problem?
Whom does it hurt?
Who benefits from the problem (or the status quo of not solving the problem)?
Who already knows about it, and who needs to be told?
Who are the people who can help implement a possible solution?
Who else might need to know, to help fund the solution and/or implement the institutional changes required?
Then, in at least 350 words, write an informal analysis of your imagined audience.  Don’t worry about formatting; instead, worry about clear thinking and thorough explanation of your thoughts. If you run out of things to say, go back to the readings and think again–who else might need to read your work? (i.e. who else might be part of your secondary or hidden audience?) What other concerns might the audience have that you didn’t think of the first time?  Remember: this is speculative writing. You don’t need facts (yet) to back up your guesses, although you may begin researching your topic to learn more about its likely audiences.

Answer Preview

APA Format,358 words

Open chat
Hello,
If you need further assistance, please send us a text here