compare/contrast the literary movements

compare/contrast the literary movements

Compare and contrast the two texts. Be sure to compare/contrast the literary movements of the texts and how they affect the texts. —> “The Revolt of ‘Mother’”

Compare and contrast the two texts. Be sure to compare/contrast the literary movements
of the texts and how they affect the texts. —> “The Revolt of ‘Mother’” and “A Rose for
Emily”: subject small town life <— Write a four-to-five page essay (not counting works cited)
in response. You may use material from an assignment response, but note that an outside
of class essay must provide more in-depth analysis. CONSIDER THESE IN CLASS
TOPICS: "The Revolt of 'Mother" Realism generally features an ethical choice. What is
Sarah's choice? Does the story believe she makes the correct one? Why or why not? "A
Rose for Emily" The story starts at Miss Emily's funeral, then jumps back and forth between
different events in her life. While the order is not chronological, there is a psychological
order that the narrator follows. The text utilizes the fragmented and tenuous connections
that human thought often meanders through. Drives and motivations that shape human
behavior. No outside sources are required for this paper, but if you use any, please cite
them appropriately. • Compare and contrast how the two texts. Be sure to compare/contrast
the literary movements of the texts and how they affect the texts. —> “The Revolt of
‘Mother’” and “A Rose for Emily”: subject small town life <— The best way to approach a
comparison and contrast essay like this is with a point by point method of organization. For
example: a. Introduction and thesis b. Similarity between texts: Text A Text B c. Similarly
two: Text A Text B d. Difference Text A Text B e. Conclusion This method makes it easier to
see the similarities and differences you are focusing on. No summaries of the texts are
required. All students should submit their proposed topics for approval by 6/18; points will
be awarded for timely submission of topics. Papers on unapproved topics may be refused
or penalized. The outline on the sample essay is also due on 6/18; you will find the Sample
Essay, “Walking Tall,” in this folder. Papers are due on 6/21 at 11 pm. Paper guidelines: 1.
Remember that a literature paper is an argument. Your goal is to present your interpretation
and offer enough evidence so that the reader will see the merit in your position. Make sure
that your thesis is arguable. 2. Make sure the paper systematically explains the thesis. Your
organization should be guided by explaining your central idea. For a comparison/contrast
essay, point by point organization is generally preferable. 3. Use specific examples from the
text to support your discussion at every point. Be sure to give the page numbers for direct
quotes. Do not make a point that you do not support with evidence from the text. 4. Explain
significance of evidence. When you offer quotes, paraphrases, summaries, etc., from the
story, do not assume that the reader will see the connection to your point as easily as you
do. Generally, writers offer a sentence or two, either before of after evidence, to indicate it
significance to the reader. Don’t overdo it and repeat yourself, but do make sure you point
out the connection of interpretation and support to the reader. 5. MLA format is expected for

all papers. In other words, give page references for quotations in parenthesis–without a p.
or pg. Here’s an example: Grahame conveys his romantic nostalgia for a simpler, rural time
when he describes the appearance of Pan, “the Friend and Helper,” who “nestl[ed] between
his very hooves . . . the little, round, podgy, childish form of the baby otter” (912). Note the
correct use of ellipsis marks and the placement of the period outside the parenthesis.
However, if, for some reason, you were to end the sentence above without a parenthetical
reference, this would be the correct punctuation: Grahame conveys his romantic nostalgia
for a simpler, rural time when he describes the appearance of Pan, “the Friend and Helper,”
who “nestl[ed] between his very hooves . . . the little, round, podgy, childish form of the baby
otter.” Remember always to introduce quotations or otherwise incorporate them into your
sentence patterns; never just drop them on your reader. You’ll notice, too, that the author is
referred to by his or her last name—not “Mr. Grahame,” not “Kenneth.” You may wish to
consult purdueowl.com for 2016 MLA guidelines. 6. No outside sources are required for this
paper, but you must cite any sources that have influenced you. See me if you need some
help. 7. This paper is for an English class. Basic grammar, punctuation, and spelling
correctness are expected (and, frankly, don’t seem like too much to ask). Proofread
carefully. 8. The paper must be a minimum of four-to-five pages long, not counting the
works cited. It should be typed, with 1-inch margins, and 11- or 12-point type.

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